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The importance of emotions within sponsorships

Emotions in sponsorship have become the heart of the sponsorship activation campaigns. This is why the communication that works best in this sense is one that reflects a feeling. In recent years we’ve witnessed an intense use of emotions. Advertisers show their emotional side in their campaigns and sponsorship activities. MasterCard has always been clear in its communication policy: "There are some things you can’t buy, for everything else there’s MasterCard" and they move this personality to their sponsorship of the Champions League whose slogan "To be part of history is priceless" hits directly in the heart of fans. This, which is becoming a usual part of the sponsor’s communication, includes something new, the creation of common spaces. Brands are inviting consumers to share their emotions. If before the framework in which the brands would move around was unidirectional, now it’s bidirectional, the brand expresses passion and invites consumers to do that as well.

The World Cup of Football in South Africa could serve to illustrate the relevance that emotions have in sponsorships and the response advertisers can get through their actions: Cruzcampo with the 'Cruzcampo Challenge', Budweiser with 'Paint your face' or Mahou with collecting signatures to propose 'July 11th National Holiday'... But one of the actions that perfectly exemplifies the use of emotions was developed by Procter & Gamble (a company who is traditionally very rational in their use of communication) and it’s association with the U.S Olympic Team during the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games.

Procter & Gamble created a moving campaign, 'Thank you Mom', with which they not only aimed to impact and attract the attention of women, and particularly mothers, but to involve them and allow them to express their feelings in a common space. During the Winter Olympics, they launched a spot titled 'Kids' where they called themselves a 'Proud Sponsor of Moms' and performed various acts where they invited the mothers of Olympic athletes to share their experiences. They also had the U.S. Paralympic Team within their sponsorship plan, supplying this initiative with an important social characteristic.

According to the company, this action improved the perception of the brands involved and that of the same womb, expand its market share and generate a hundred million dollars in additional sales.

After the success of this campaign, P&G decided to extend its sponsorship strategy internationally, and in August 2010 and for the next five years, turned into a sponsor for the International Olympic Committee.

Source: Johan Cruyff Institute


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The importance of emotions within sponsorships

Emotions in sponsorship have become the heart of the sponsorship activation campaigns. This is why the communication that works best in this sense is one that reflects a feeling. In recent years we’ve witnessed an intense use of emotions. Advertisers show their emotional side in their campaigns and sponsorship activities. MasterCard has always been clear in its communication policy: "There are some things you can’t buy, for everything else there’s MasterCard" and they move this personality to their sponsorship of the Champions League whose slogan "To be part of history is priceless" hits directly in the heart of fans. This, which is becoming a usual part of the sponsor’s communication, includes something new, the creation of common spaces. Brands are inviting consumers to share their emotions. If before the framework in which the brands would move around was unidirectional, now it’s bidirectional, the brand expresses passion and invites consumers to do that as well.

The World Cup of Football in South Africa could serve to illustrate the relevance that emotions have in sponsorships and the response advertisers can get through their actions: Cruzcampo with the 'Cruzcampo Challenge', Budweiser with 'Paint your face' or Mahou with collecting signatures to propose 'July 11th National Holiday'... But one of the actions that perfectly exemplifies the use of emotions was developed by Procter & Gamble (a company who is traditionally very rational in their use of communication) and it’s association with the U.S Olympic Team during the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games.

Procter & Gamble created a moving campaign, 'Thank you Mom', with which they not only aimed to impact and attract the attention of women, and particularly mothers, but to involve them and allow them to express their feelings in a common space. During the Winter Olympics, they launched a spot titled 'Kids' where they called themselves a 'Proud Sponsor of Moms' and performed various acts where they invited the mothers of Olympic athletes to share their experiences. They also had the U.S. Paralympic Team within their sponsorship plan, supplying this initiative with an important social characteristic.

According to the company, this action improved the perception of the brands involved and that of the same womb, expand its market share and generate a hundred million dollars in additional sales.

After the success of this campaign, P&G decided to extend its sponsorship strategy internationally, and in August 2010 and for the next five years, turned into a sponsor for the International Olympic Committee.

Source: Johan Cruyff Institute


More about sponsorships

Let's do this!

We got you covered for all your marketing needs